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Our Curriculum

Each term, in the class newsletter, parents will be made aware of the curriculum being taught for the term. In addition, knowledge organisers are posted on the class blog. These knowledge organisers give information about vocabulary, main points for learning and additional websites and activities to support children’s learning.

Long Term Curriculum Plan

Please click here for a copy of our Long Term Curriculum Plan

Early Years Foundation Stage

Foundation Curriculum

The Foundation Curriculum is based on the Department for Education and Skills document called the Early Years Foundation Stage.  This sets out the knowledge, skills and understanding which young children should have acquired by the end of the academic year in which they reach the age of five.

The curriculum is organised into seven areas of learning:

  • Personal, Social and Emotional
  • Communication and Language
  • Physical development
  • Literacy
  • Mathematical development
  • Understanding the world
  • Expressive Arts and Design

​Personal, social and emotional learning is a very important aspect of children's development as it supports them learning how to work independently; how to share; how to behave appropriately and to generally develop skills that will help them to become effective learners.

These seven areas are used by teachers to plan the learning environment, activities and experiences for children in the foundation stage classes.

Click here for a Parents' Guide to the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework.

English

English is a core subject of the National Curriculum and a pre-requisite for educational and social progress as it underpins the work undertaken in all areas of the curriculum. At Queensway, we strive to ensure that all our pupils receive a well-rounded learning experience when reading, writing, speaking and listening which will equip them with the fundamental tools to achieve in school and beyond. 

Reading

We are committed to promoting reading for pleasure; we strive to instil a love for reading, a passion for discovery and a confidence to explore the imagination. The school takes part in World Book Day, teachers organise class visits to the local library, plan author visits and have systems set up in Reception, Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 to reward children who read books at  home. To encourage parents’ involvement in reading we have reading advice booklets, parent workshops, phonics information on the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 class pages. All children will have a variety of reading experiences; this includes guided reading (reading and comprehension in a small group), 1:1 reading (with individual bookmarks for the children’s targets), children reading independently, hearing stories in class or in the reading assembly. Children may also read with Arch reading volunteers or parent volunteers.

In the early stages of reading the focus of teaching is the development of phonics and the application of this knowledge in reading. Learning and application of phonics are inseparable and linked together through reading and writing. Children will have a wide experience of books, and in addition vocabulary. Another important strand of reading is the children’s understanding of what they are reading. For planning and teaching, teachers focus on the content domains (as set out in the National Curriculum) for each key stage. Our progression of skills document and assessments are linked with these domains. In Key stage 2 the domains are taught through the “Vipers” questioning strategy.

For the teaching of reading teachers use a variety of books and texts, this could include books from a reading scheme, magazines, newspaper articles, web pages, fiction and non-fiction books. We do not follow a particular reading scheme but use a variety of books from different sources.     

Writing

We aim to inspire the children to be excited about their writing and achieve their full potential. As a staff we hope to pass on our enthusiasm and help the children to believe that they are valued writers. Children are taught in mixed ability groups, but activities are differentiated to support the children’s needs. Our Queensway approach to writing follows a sequence of learning beginning with exploration of the text type (also linked with guided reading), examining and practising the grammatical features, linguistic content and the style of language within a text, planning for writing, teachers modelling the writing and children writing independently. Spelling and grammar are taught in specific lessons but will be applied through independent writing. Children are encouraged to plan, draft and edit their work as part of the writing process. In Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1, children are encouraged to apply their phonic knowledge in order to write with independence.

    

Speaking and Listening

We support our children in developing the skills necessary to speak fluently and confidently to communicate their ideas and emotions. Through our exciting and engaging curriculum, we actively encourage our children to communicate their thoughts and ideas with explicit teaching of subject specific vocabulary where appropriate. Children are given the opportunity to reflect on both their learning and feelings.

Humanities (Geography, History & RE)

As part of our Humanities studies at Queensway, children will have opportunities to explore places with different geographical features and immerse themselves in the historical time periods to develop and enhance their understanding of what life was like during these times. In order to facilitate this, we arrange trips and experiences as well as inviting experts in these fields into school to share their knowledge and experience of the topic.

Geography

At Queensway, we aim to promote an understanding and familiarity of a wide range of places and people, covering geographical features of Britain and across the world. We believe that children should have a secure understanding of the world around them, beginning with their local area, to their country and to the continents of the world.

In Foundation Stage, Humanities is interwoven throughout the EYFS curriculum to ensure a breadth of adult-led and child-led learning experiences. Humanities fall within the ‘understanding the world’ strand of the early years' framework, which is encompasses the following Early Learning Goals: Past and Present; People, Culture and Communities; The Natural World. Within Geography, children develop their concept of locational knowledge by explaining similarities and differences between their own lives and lives of people in different countries, drawing on knowledge from stories, non-fiction texts maps. Aspects of physical geography are covered through providing children with opportunities to describe their immediate environment using knowledge from observation, discussion and drawing pictures of animals, plants and landscapes. Furthermore, children are enabled to identify and describe the similarities and differences between the natural world around them and contrasting environments, drawing on their own experiences and shared fiction and non-fiction texts.

In Key Stage 1, we focus on Geography of the local area and community, as well as widening the children’s understanding of some geographical features, such as their addresses. We compare countries within the United Kingdom, including naming and learning each of the capital cities. In doing so, we believe that children will build an awareness and understanding of where they live in relation to other important places within our country.

Throughout Key Stage 2, we encourage children to develop a greater understanding of the physical geographical features, including caves and coastal areas early on. Children are taught about the human impact on the environment and why it is important to take responsibility for our actions. Early mapping skills through identifying landmarks are taught as well as children having the opportunity to begin to read universal map symbols, such as Ordinance Survey maps.

Alongside the focus of Geography in Britain, it is our belief that children should have an awareness of how geography dictates the wider world and understand how this can affect lifestyle choices of people around the world.

As part of Geography studies, we feel that it is important that children can immerse themselves in their immediate environment, as well as exploring places with different geographical features, which are further afield. In order to facilitate this, we arrange trips to geographically significant places in the local area as well as inviting experts in these fields into to share their knowledge and experience of the topic. Furthermore, we have a wide range of physical resources, which aid the children’s understanding of their geography topics. Children are also encouraged to bring in items from home, which relate to the topic.

Within our school, we believe that the children’s ability to identify similarities and differences between different places and people are important in order to allow them to empathise and understand views and lifestyles of others, without bias and judgement. To enable this, we aim to cover similar concepts, such as habitats, climates and adaptation, in different locations around the world.

At Queensway, we endeavour to teach an equal balance of history and geography topics each year. This is delivered through weekly sessions throughout the year, which incorporate plenty of high-quality writing opportunities.

A long-term plan has been devised to ensure that there is full coverage of geography topics across the school, with a separate progression of skills specifically stating which skills are to be taught in each year group. The subject leader will be responsible for monitoring the planning and teaching of geography at Queensway in line with the school’s geography policy, to ensure that the breadth of topics and skills are being delivered.

As a result, we believe that the children of Queensway have the opportunity to grow into well-rounded geographers, with a sound understand of how places and people from around the globe shape the modern world both around them and throughout the world.

History

At Queensway, we endeavour to promote an understanding and familiarity of a wide range of time periods throughout history, covering historical time periods in Britain and across the world. We believe that children should have a secure understanding of events which have happened in the past and how these have had an impact on the way we live today, in line with the national curriculum.

In Foundation Stage, Humanities is interwoven throughout the EYFS curriculum to ensure a breadth of adult-led and child-led learning experiences. Humanities fall within the ‘understanding the world’ strand of the early years' framework, which encompasses the following Early Learning Goals: Past and Present; People, Culture and Communities; The Natural World. In History, children are encouraged to appreciate the basic concept of chronology within their own lives and the lives of people in their social circle. Children at the expected level of development will: talk about the lives of the people around them and their roles in society; now some similarities and differences between things in the past and now, drawing on their experiences and what has been read in class; understand the past through settings, characters and events encountered in books read in class and storytelling.

In Key Stage 1, we focus on the history of the local area and community, as well as widening the children’s understanding with studies about important historical figures, such as Florence Nightingale, and events in Britain such as the Great Fire of London.

In doing so, we believe that children will build an awareness and understanding of events which have happened in the past and how they affect what is happening in the present day.

Throughout Key Stage 2, we encourage children to develop a greater understanding of chronology by learning about important historical events in Britain in order, beginning from the Stone Age and Iron Age, up to the impact of World War Two in Britain.

Alongside the focus of history in Britain, it is our belief that children should have an awareness of how history has shaped wider world and understand how this affects the different cultural beliefs of people throughout the world.

As part of history studies, we feel that it is important that children can immerse themselves in the historical times periods to develop and enhance their understanding of what life was like during these times. In order to facilitate this, we arrange trips to historically significant places in the local area as well as inviting experts in these fields into to share their knowledge and experience of the topic. Furthermore, children are encouraged to bring in items and artefacts from home, which relate to the topic.

Within our school, we believe that the children’s ability to identify similarities and differences between different points in history is important in order to allow them to empathise and understand the different views of others. To enable this, we aim to cover similar concepts, such as transport, food and clothing, in the different time periods.

At Queensway, we endeavour to teach an equal balance of history and geography topics each year. This is delivered through weekly sessions throughout the year, which incorporate plenty of high-quality writing opportunities.

A long-term plan has been devised to ensure that there is full coverage of history topics across the school, with a separate progression of skills specifically stating which skills are to be taught in each year group. The subject leader will be responsible for monitoring the planning and teaching of history at Queensway in line with the school’s history policy, to ensure that the breadth of topics and skills are being delivered.

As a result, we believe that the children of Queensway have the opportunity to grow into well-rounded historians, with a sound understanding of how events and people from the past have shaped the modern world, both around them and throughout the world.

RE

At Queensway, we are committed to delivering a quality religious education curriculum. We celebrate and promote the diversity of religious beliefs within our school, community and wider world. Our ethos is one of openness, tolerance, acceptance and inclusion of those from all faiths and religious beliefs, which we want the children to understand and apply throughout their lives. Throughout the school, we follow Oxfordshire Agreed syllabus, which focuses on the three religions: Christianity, Islam and Judaism.

Key Stage 1:

In KS1, we explore a range of religious stories, writings and their meaning. We name and explore a range of celebrations and consider why these are important, for some people, to belong to a religion and recognise the difference this makes to their lives. We explore this thorough art, for example, identifying and recognising religious symbols and discuss their meanings.

We encourage children to reflect on and consider religious beliefs and spiritual feelings, experiences and concepts including worship and celebrations. They are asked to respond imaginatively to puzzling questions and identify what matters to them and others. Through the teaching, children can recognise that religious beliefs make a difference to individuals, families and communities.

Key Stage 2:

Children are encouraged to describe the key aspects of religions, through the stories traditions, people and customs that influence practise and beliefs. They will be able to describe the variety of practises of the way of life in religions. We celebrate and promote the similarities and differences between religions through discussing personal experiences and arrange visitors to come in and share their faiths. We encourage children to ask ethical questions and begin to understand religions and other responses to them.

We have creates links with the wider community, which enables the children to visit a range of places of religious significance in the local area. We also invite members of different religious groups from the community to come into school and share their expertise with the children. In addition, events are organised in school alongside religious leaders to further immerse the children in the cultures and beliefs of others.

At Queensway, we endeavour to teach a balanced RE curriculum each year. This is delivered through weekly sessions throughout the year, which incorporate plenty of high-quality writing opportunities. Occasionally, these sessions may be blocked into a themed day. In addition to the class-based learning, children partake in collective worship, which is based on the school’s values.

The RE Leader at Queensway is responsible for monitoring the quality of teaching and learning for RE in line with school policy. This includes lesson observation, monitoring of planning and assessment data and staff training and CPD, including working with the RE leaders in our Quad schools.

What does RE look like in Foundation Stage:  

At Queensway, RE is interwoven throughout the EYFS curriculum to ensure a breadth of adult-led and child-led learning experiences. Because of our diverse population, there is ample opportunity to celebrate cultural similarities and differences within our community, such as, in Term 1 our Foundation Stage children discover ‘Where we come from?’ In Nursery, our diverse demographic is complimented with a theme of ‘How We Celebrate’. Children are carefully encouraged to take ownership of their learning through provocateurs such as: planning a party for Danny Dog. Use of learning characters, such as Danny Dog, provide specific opportunities for development of widening children’s vocabulary. Furthermore, strong links are made within the RE and our environment. Developing prior knowledge is a keystone of the EYFS curriculum at Queensway, for example in Term 6 children discuss similarities and differences of the countries where they’re from.                                                      Foundation children can:

Nursery:

Reception:

  • Shows an interest in the lives of children who are familiar to them.
  • Enjoys joining in with family customs and routines.
  • Remembers and talks about significant events in their own experience.
  • Recognises and describes special times of events for family or friends.
  • Knows about some of the things that can make them unique, and can talk about similarities and differences in relations to family or friends.
  • Enjoys joining in with family routines and customs.
  • Talks about past and present events in their own lives and others.
  • Knows that other children do not always like the same things, and is sensitive to this.
  • Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others amongst families, communities, cultures and traditions.

Statutory ELG:

People, Culture and Communities

  • Describe their immediate environment using knowledge from observation, discussion, stories, non-fiction texts and maps.
  •  Know some similarities and differences between different religious and cultural communities in this country, drawing on their experiences and what has been read in class.
  • Explain some similarities and differences between life in this country and life in other countries, drawing on knowledge from stories, non-fiction texts and (when appropriate) maps.

Computing

​Computing is an integral part of our everyday lives and will play an immeasurable part in our children’s future.​

At Queensway, we provide all of our children with the skills, creativity and enthusiasm to live and thrive in a world which is becoming increasingly dependent on computing. Our vision is that children know how to use technology safely and responsibly, so that they participate effectively in the digital world both inside school and in their daily life. As computing technology underpins today’s modern lifestyle, it is essential that all pupils gain the confidence and ability they need in the subject, preparing them for the challenges of a rapidly developing and changing technological world.

Through Computing, children will develop their understanding of how technology works, how computer systems are designed and programmed, and this will allow children to develop their computational thinking. The children have many opportunities to use technology. While all the basic IT skills are covered (e.g. making a simple document or using paint programmes), the children’s experience soon develops, and so at Queensway children are beginning to blog, make web pages, create computer games and animation. As they go through the school, they will explore augmented reality, social networking and coding, where they will be encouraged to generate content for younger children. We believe this gives them all the experiences they need to prepare them for 21st century lifestyles.

Using technology safely is central to our approach to learning. E-safety is embedded into our curriculum with discrete e-safety lessons taking place at the start of every term, as well as informal discussions and reminders taking place during other lesson times. Children will be taught to use technology safely and responsibly and they are taught to discuss how to report any concerns that they have with an adult. We recognise that e-safety needs to reach beyond the classroom and we offer parents workshops, so that they understand how to best support their children’s use of technology at home. Technology is a key method of delivering parental communication through our regularly updated website and each class have individual blogs.

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS):

In the early years of study, the children may have some early encounters with a range of technology including television, iPads and technological or digital toys. The early years are therefore their introduction to refining and igniting their curiosity into technology further, as well as ensuring children use technology safely.

Children growing up today are immersed in new technologies. In the home, going shopping, at the doctors and in the street – technology is embedded in children’s everyday experiences sometimes to the point where it is almost invisible to them. As part of some of their first activities with computing, we ensure children have early technology experiences such as: CD players, listening stations, talking tins, old keypads, phones, calculators, cameras and TV remotes in the role-playing areas in both Reception and Nursery. Children will also have access to Beebots, iPads, stop watches, interactive whiteboards, remote control cars and experience sharing digital books and using search engines to find out information. They will also have the opportunity to draw on paint programs and use iPads to video and take photographs.

Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2:

Our school delivers the computing curriculum through weekly discrete lessons and cross-curricular learning. Children develop their digital literacy, computer science and information technology through a range of hardware (Chromebooks, iPads, Beebots and Micro: bits) and software (Purple Mash, Scratch, Python). Lessons are planned by following Purple Mash, Scratch, BBC: Microbit and Python schemes of work, which supports our teachers in delivering fun and engaging lessons which help to raise the standards and allow children to achieve their full potential. Teachers will use these lesson plans across their year group on a termly basis and these will be adapted to meet the specific needs of their class. Teachers will use the computing assessment grids for their year group, which integrates the range of software, to track their classes progress and this will be regularly reviewed and completed on a termly basis.

I23ICT

The school’s server and computing infrastructure is maintained by 123ICT, and we are visited on a weekly basis by a technician to solve any onsite issues. Any issues with technology not working correctly should be reported through the 123ICT Help Board.

Maths

At Queensway School we follow a Maths Mastery approach.   

 What is Maths Mastery?

  • A high level of performance for all 
  • Keeping the class working together whilst addressing the needs for all pupils to master the curriculum and for some to gain greater depth and proficiency 
  • A mind-set - All children can achieve with good teaching, appropriate resources, effort and a ‘can-do’ attitude. 
  • The manner in which the curriculum is designed, focusing on fewer topics in depth, repetition and application. All pupils have access to the ideas and concepts
  • Deep and sustainable learning – for all Depth is the key to avoiding the need to repeat teaching. It doesn’t feel like we’re starting again each term.

 How this looks in practice:

  • Teachers use the progression of skills document to plan their Maths medium and short term plans.           
  • All teachers should be updating integris regularly particularly at the end of a unit.                  
  • Parallel teachers take it in turn to plan Maths but then are expected to adapt this for their own classes.   
  • The weekly Maths should be planned with an emphasis on really grasping their understanding of the objective through a range of models and images.                              
  • When planning, teachers need to look at what they know previously and what they need to do to achieve the objectives.                                                                                                                          
  • The calculation policy should be used when planning and visual images are hugely linked to the work in all year groups that the children are covering. 
  • To ensure that essential number skills are given priority all teachers will include an extra daily counting session in their timetables where they can cover the “on the boil” objectives from the school long term progression of skills document.

 Using Resources and books

All classrooms have a range of practical resources to help with the teaching of Maths.  It is important that all children have the opportunity to use a range of resources and understand the limitations of these.  The resources all classes have varies throughout the year groups, but every class should have access to Numicon, Cuisenaire, multilink and dienes.  Tens frames are used in key stage one.

We don’t follow a scheme, but teachers should be using a range of resources which includes Maths' No Problem, Inspire Maths and white Rose.

 Marking 

In Maths, we recognise that to set targets and next steps, is challenging because there are many areas within the Maths curriculum.  Therefore, we have adopted a robust system of addressing misconceptions and extending children’s learning within each unit of work through our pink for think marking.  Children’s next steps in learning in Maths are identified from the progression of skills document and evidence is seen in teacher’s annotated weekly planning.

Every piece of work is marked against the Learning Objective in Maths for Years 1-4 with teachers highlighting the Learning Objective in green if achieved and pink if not achieved.  In Key Stage 2 this becomes more of a child-led assessment, whereby children are asked to traffic light their work and by Year 5 they comment ‘why’ if they are red or amber.  If a child has self-assessed themselves as red, this is followed up by the teacher.  This will be acknowledged by ‘D’ for discussion, green pen in books or evidence on annotated planning.  

 Homework 

All children from Year 1 onwards bring home weekly homework.

 Role of the Maths Leader

  • Ensure the school has a clear vision for Maths and what you want all children to achieve.
  • Set up and keep a subject file including an action plan, progression of skills document, Maths policy and calculation policy, and ensure these are kept up to date.  Ensure your audit of what you are good at is honest, reflective and shows what needs to be worked on and by when. 
  • Support new teachers to understand Queensway’s mastery approach and monitor both short and medium term plans throughout the year as well as monitoring through lesson observations the teaching of all staff.
  • Provide staff with training on new initiatives and changes which would support the teaching of Maths.  Be supportive to all staff and allow opportunities for staff to watch your Maths teaching and discuss approaches being taught.
  • Attend partnership meetings and moderation meetings and feedback information to relevant staff.
  • Moderate Maths work as part of team meetings ensuring you have good examples and next steps are targeted and achievable.  Also monitor Maths assessment at the end of each assessment period to ensure consistency throughout the school.
  • Look at data throughout the year and ensure action plans are being written and implemented where needed.  Support staff and work with individual children to moderate.  Use this data to write reports to governors on the progress and attainment of Maths throughout the year and at the end of the year.
  • Reflect on your own subject knowledge and look at ways to improve through professional development opportunities.  To create an environment where people feel confident to share their teaching ideas.  Keep up to date with new initiatives and also monitor resources available and when these need to be replenished.

 What does Maths look like in Foundation Stage? 

Developing a strong grounding in number is essential so that all children develop the necessary building blocks to excel mathematically.  Children should be able to count confidently, develop a deep understanding of the numbers to 10, the relationships between them and the patterns within those numbers.

What are the expectations for Maths in the New EYFS Framework?

Number

Children at the expected level of development will:

  • have a deep understanding of numbers to 10, including the composition of each number;
  • subitise (recognise quantities without counting) up to 5;
  • automatically recall (without reference to rhymes, counting or other aids) number bonds up to 5 (including subtraction facts) and some number bonds to 10, including doubling facts. 

 Numerical Patterns

Children at the expected level of development will:

  • verbally count beyond 20, recognising the pattern of the counting system;
  • compare quantities up to 10 in different contexts, recognising when one quantity is greater than, less than or the same as the other quantity;
  • explore and represent patterns within numbers up to 10, including evens and odds, double facts and how quantities can be distributed equally. 

How do we achieve this?

At Queensway School we have a progression of skills document that starts when the children join us in nursery and progresses all the way to Year 6.  Class teachers use this document to plan their medium and short-term planning.

In Nursery and Reception every classroom has a Maths area and teachers plan time every day for the children to have a focused Maths whole class session.  They also always ensure there are activities to support the objectives the children are working on.

There are lots of practical equipment in every class which the children have the opportunity to use including multilink, Cuisenaire, threading equipment, dice, sorting objects, compare bear, tens frame etc.  The Early Years' environment is engaging all children to gain an interest in number.

    

 

Modern Foreign Languages

At Queensway Primary School we believe that the learning of a foreign language provides a valuable educational, social and cultural experience for our pupils. It helps them to develop communication skills including key skills of speaking and listening and extends their knowledge of how language works. Learning another language gives children a new perspective on the world, encouraging them to understand their own cultures and those of others. Children from Year Two upwards all learn French on a weekly basis with their class teacher. In Year Two, French is taught within the daily routines, such as when doing the register, or through songs and games as ‘Brain Break’ activities.

At Queensway Primary School we integrate language learning into everyday school life, with teachers, teaching assistants and children using and experimenting with their knowledge of different languages whenever the opportunity arises. We foster a problem-solving approach, giving children opportunities to work out language use for themselves in a supportive context where risk-taking and creativity are encouraged, and there is an emphasis on having fun with the language. ICT is used where appropriate to enhance teaching and learning.

There are four main contexts in which language teaching and learning takes place at Queensway:

1. Language lessons

Children are taught specific skills, concepts and vocabulary in weekly dedicated lessons. Teachers may also decide to teach French as a block of lessons. In Key Stage Two, lessons are planned and taught follow the Kapow Primary Scheme of Work. The content of these lessons is reinforced by the class teacher during the week, following our ‘on the boil’ curriculum. Parents are given a Knowledge Organiser at the start of every term with the key vocabulary and grammar that the children will be learning in French.

The children’s skills and knowledge are assessed at the end of every term using the Queensway Assessment Grids and teachers note who is working above, at and below expected. Parents are given a Knowledge Organiser at the start of every term with the key vocabulary and grammar that the children will be learning that term in French.

2. Languages embedded into other lessons

Where appropriate, teachers give children opportunities to practice their foreign language in the context of lessons in other subject areas. For instance, some instructions may be given in another language in PE; or children may count in another language whilst carrying out a numeracy activity. This acts to reinforce the vocabulary and structures they have learned.

3. ‘Incidental’ language

Languages are part of the day-to-day life of the school. For example, teachers use the foreign language to give simple classroom instructions (‘come in quietly’; ‘listen’; ‘look’) to ask questions (‘what’s today’s date?’) and to take the register, give children permission to leave the room. Children are encouraged to respond using the language they have earned and sometimes teachers and pupils develop new language skills together, teachers acting as role models in the learning process.

This integrated approach is a strong model for teaching and learning, giving children opportunities to use and develop their language for communicating in stress-free, real life contexts.

4. Themed Days                                                                                                                            At Queensway we organise an annual French Day which enables us to raise the profile of the language and engage parents in children’s learning. It is also an opportunity for children to use their language skills in different contexts and to learn more about French culture.

PSHE

PSHE (Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education) is embedded in everything we do at Queensway. We strive to promote pupils’ self-esteem and emotional well-being through our curriculum, school environment and ethos. Through PSHE, we help pupils to form and maintain worthwhile and satisfying relationships based on respect for themselves and for others, at home, at school, at work and in the community. PSHE is an integral part of Queensway’s ethos, thus we encourage and support children to adopt a can do attitude, be focused and resilient, challenge and question, be independent learners and be respectful, well-mannered and caring.

At Queensway, we have an elected school council who are actively involved in promoting PSHE and Economic issues, alongside other members of the school community such as; young leaders, wellbeing warriors and reading buddies.

Each year group teaches PSHE through a dedicated weekly lesson alongside specific events and activities taught through other subjects. Opportunities for PSHE education also occur during collective worship such as block assembly, singing, stories and discussion. Underpinning all of this is our whole school ethos which promotes our work in PSHE, specifically through values education.

PSHE in the EYFS

In Foundation Stage, PSED is taught throughout the whole curriculum and in circle time sessions. Learning in Foundation Stage is based on the principles that:

  • every child is unique and is constantly learning;
  • children learn to be strong and independent through positive relationships;
  • children learn and develop well in enabling environments.

The Characteristics of Effective Learning underpin all our learning and these skills are explicitly taught to the children throughout the year by the use of characters such as ‘Never Give up Nemo’ and ‘Concentration Kitty.’ Through regular discussions, children are encouraged to talk about their learning and recognise what it was that helped them. As a school, we recognise that children all develop at different times and learn in different ways. Therefore, planning is tailored to meet the needs of individuals.

In the Early Years Foundation Stage, PSHE education is about making connections. It is taught both through regular planned activities such as circle times that are part of topics, as well as on a daily, individual basis to develop personal skills such as dressing, feeding and toileting. Positive experiences are built through daily opportunities, to share and enjoy a range of different activities both adult and child initiated. Play is valued in our Early Years and is an essential component in effectively developing children’s PSED skills.

Our learning environments are carefully planned and set up purposefully to enable children to select their own resources, problem solve and interact with their peers. Children are given the opportunity to engage in a range of social activities, as members of a small group, whole class or occasionally during whole-school activities. Strong, warm and supportive relationships formed with adults enable children to learn how to understand their own feelings and those of others.

Children are supported to manage emotions, develop a positive sense of self, set themselves simple goals, have confidence in their own abilities, to persist and wait for what they want and direct attention as necessary. In order to support this, in our Early Years classrooms we use colour monsters linked to the whole school Zones of Regulation approach to help children identify their feelings and develop effective self-regulation skills. Through adult modelling and guidance, children learn how to look after their bodies, including healthy eating, and manage personal needs independently. Through supported interaction with their peers, they learn how to make good friendships, co-operate and resolve conflicts peaceably.

By the end of Foundation Stage, we want our children to be able to:

ELG: Self-Regulation

  • Show an understanding of their own feelings and those of others, and begin to regulate their behaviour accordingly;
  • Set and work towards simple goals, being able to wait for what they want and control their immediate impulses when appropriate;
  • Give focused attention to what the teacher says, responding appropriately even when engaged in activity, and show an ability to follow instructions involving several ideas or actions.

ELG: Managing Self

  • Be confident to try new activities and show independence, resilience and perseverance in the face of challenge;
  • Explain the reasons for rules, know right from wrong and try to behave accordingly;
  • Manage their own basic hygiene and personal needs, including dressing, going to the toilet and understanding the importance of healthy food choices.

ELG: Building Relationships

  • Work and play cooperatively and take turns with others;
  • Form positive attachments to adults and friendships with peers;
  • Show sensitivity to their own and to others’ needs.

PSHE in KS1-KS2

PSHE at Queensway is taught through half termly themes such as: me and my relationships, valuing difference and rights and responsibilities. These themes support our values education and promotion of British Values. The yearly overview of themes is organised by the PSHE leader.

For the teaching of PSHE, teachers use SCARF alongside a range of other specific resources such as, Relationships and Sex Education resources, Junior Citizen, Protective Behaviour and Risk Avert. We do not follow a particular scheme, but use a variety of resources that have been specifically chosen and adapted based on the needs of the children. Teachers will plan and choose methods which are most appropriate for their whole class to meet the objectives of the lesson. All teachers will endeavour to provide a safe learning environment so that children feel safe and valued to share their ideas. Each class use circle time to promote and discuss issues within PSHE.

At Queensway, we feel that it is vital that children learn about a range of similarities and differences, such as physical appearance, personality, likes, dislikes and opinions. This helps them to understand that we are all unique human beings and that we should be proud of this. Within the context of these lessons, children will also be introduced to different cultures, ethnicities, religions and beliefs and also learn about LGBTQ+ people, as well as those with disabilities or special needs. When discussing any differences between people, we teach children to form opinions about others based on whether they are kind, law-abiding, respectful, trustworthy, and responsible people, rather than judging them on appearance or particular aspects of their lifestyle which may be different to their own. This is supported by our LELE project (Learn Equality, Live Equally) work we have completed as a school.

As a school, we are extremely passionate about equipping children with the building blocks to develop and maintain positive mental health, including strategies they can use to support themselves if they are feeling low or anxious. As part of our work to support children’s emotional regulation, each class uses ‘Zones of Regulation’ to support discussions about emotions and how we can support our brain, to be ready to learn.

We recognise that for some children, developing positive mental health and wellbeing can be challenging and therefore, additional focussed teaching may need to be put into place to support this. Working closely with the Mental Health Schools Team enables us to provide early intervention for those who need additional support. These interventions help our children to understand themselves, their emotions and how to be successful both in and outside of school.

Embedded within our teaching of PSHE is the desire to tailor our https://hillview-school.co.uk/portals/0/icons/scib-logo-small.pngcurriculum to what the children really need. Therefore, we also follow a curriculum designed by experts in our local community - Safeguarding Children in Banbury. The SCIB progression of skills is differentiated and taught appropriately based on the children’s age and level of understanding and these sessions are taught by class teachers within weekly PSHE education lessons. Each year group follows a progression of key learning objectives which relate to PSHE outcomes. 

The curriculum is taught three times a year alongside our PSHE curriculum. During these lessons and through scenario-based activities, the children have the opportunity to develop crucial skills, confidence and the ability to tackle new and unfamiliar situations that they might find themselves in throughout their lives. The three key skills are:

  • Recognise early warning signs
  • Risk assess
  • Take action

The role of the PSHE leader:

  • To lead the review of the PSHE policy and programme.
  • To ensure that resources are relevant, appropriate to the needs of the children and up to date with statutory requirements,
  • To ensure that staff have the necessary skills, confidence, knowledge and resources in order to deliver effective PSHE.

Science

At Queensway, we recognise that in an increasingly scientific and technological age children need to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes to better prepare them for modern life.

Young children are naturally curious and passionate about learning. At Queensway, we provide a stimulating science curriculum that nurtures children’s natural curiosity and their ongoing intellectual development. Through a hands-on, enquiry-based curriculum, children will experience the joy of having wonderful ideas, exploration and investigation – that is, the joy of finding out.

Real-life experiences are a fundamental part of our approach and members of the community are regularly invited in to share their experience and expertise. Similarly, we engage our pupils with exciting school trips and visitors to enhance the curriculum such as visits to the local allotments and secondary schools.

At Queensway, there is a whole school ethos of understanding and caring for the world around us and an understanding of our responsibility towards both the immediate and wider environment and community. This is demonstrated with our involvement in community projects such as ‘Banbury in Bloom’ and annual Science days. Science week is carefully planned to boost the profile to Science across all key stages and inspire the next generation of scientists.

We recognise that the school grounds offer a rich resource which we can utilise to inspire and effectively meet the requirements of the EYFS Framework and National Curriculum Programmes of Study. As part of our provision, children in the younger year groups take part in forest school. During their sessions, the children are encouraged to be curious and ask and answer questions about the natural world around them.

Our dedicated team of teachers deliver weekly Science lessons by following a clear long term plan. Our Science progression of skills document provides a clear overarching framework from which teachers can plan well-sequenced and differentiated lessons. The Science leader is responsible for careful monitoring of planning, resources and ensuring staff are equipped to plan and deliver lessons confidently.

In Foundation Stage, Science is taught through the ‘Understanding of the World’ section of the Early Years Foundation Stage curriculum and aims to develop children’s curiosity and passion for Science and general team working skills. Science at Queensway is introduced indirectly through activities that encourage every child to explore, problem solve, observe, predict, think, make decisions and talk about the world around them. These activities are delivered in numerous ways, for example through Continuous Provision, Enhanced Provision (‘Busy Birds’ time), Teacher-led inputs (whole class and in small groups) and Spontaneous Learning. This allows children who have a natural interest to develop their questions and observations through child-led learning, with adults following their lead and providing additional opportunities to explore ideas further. This might allow adults to begin to identify some children who might go on to be a Most Able child in Science, in addition to those who may need the greatest support.

At Queensway, children in both Nursery and Reception are able to develop their scientific skills through exploring the following areas within the Foundation Stage provision:

  • water tray
  • sand pit
  • bug hunts
  • construction area, investigation station
  • curiosity cube
  • growing area
  • mud kitchen
  • sound station
  • small world
  • windy day resources
  • a wide variety of non-fiction texts available.

These areas and activities are available to the children in their classrooms, both inside and outside.

Foundation Stage children can:

Nursery

   Reception

  • Comment and asks questions about aspects of their familiar world such as the place where they live or the natural world
  • Talks about why things happen and how things work
  • Developing an understanding of growth, decay and changes over time
  • Shows care and concern for living things and the environment
  • Begin to understand the effect their behaviour can have on the environment
  • Looks closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change in nature
  • Knows about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things
  • Talks about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another
  • Makes observations of animals and plants and explains why some things occur, and talks about changes

By the end of Foundation stage, we want our children to be able to:

Statutory ELG: The Natural World

Children at the expected level of development will:

  • Explore the natural world around them, making observations and drawing pictures of animals and plants.
  • Know some similarities and differences between the natural world around them and contrasting environments, drawing on their experiences and what has been read in class.
  • Understand some important processes and changes in the natural world around them, including the seasons and changing states of matter.

Sports & PE

Curriculum

At Queensway Primary School, we believe that physical education, experienced in a safe and supportive environment, is a unique and vital contributor to a pupil’s physical development and well-being. Through PE & Sport our children learn to develop the important qualities of discipline, resilience, communication, teamwork, and ambition, leading to improved concentration, attitude, and academic work.

Our PE curriculum aims to ensure that all pupils develop the fundamental skills and competence to excel in a wide range of physical activities by providing a broad & balanced curriculum with opportunities for all to be enjoyed.

For PE, we follow the scheme ‘Get Set 4 PE’ where we use and adapt the lesson plans and resources to support our current children and their needs. This scheme follows a clear progression from basic fundamental skills to whole game situations.

PE in EYFS

Children in EYFS at Queensway are exposed to physical activity in a variety of ways, which is part of the ‘physical development’ section of the EYFS framework. Children have daily access to outdoor areas, where they experience a range of activities, such as riding bikes, climbing on a climbing frame and ball skills. Children in the EYFS also attend forest school sessions, weekly, where they can develop their fine and gross motor skills in a different environment using various materials not available in the classroom.

Children develop their fine motor skills, through activities such as threading, scissor work, holding pencils and hammering. There is always a variety of activities available to the children both in the continuous and enhanced provision that allow them to practise the fine motor skills needed for writing. In Nursery, children take part in ‘dough disco’ and ‘squiggle while you wiggle’. In Reception, children focus specifically on woodwork. Children develop their gross motor skills through activities where they must negotiate working through obstacles safely as well as having the opportunity to use the outside area to explore different ways of moving – skipping, running, jumping, etc. The main skills that are developed at this stage are: core strength, stability, balance, spatial awareness, co-ordination, and agility. In Reception, the children also take part in a weekly PE lesson.

The aim of PE in the EYFS is for children to feel confident trying new activities, developing their independence and resilience, whilst facing new challenges. In doing so, children will also be learning how to take turns and work cooperatively. PE and physical development also allow the children to develop the characteristics of effective learning – playing and exploring, active learning and creating and thinking critically.

PE in KS1 and KS2

Children at Queensway receive two hours of physical education per week (indoor and outdoor). As well as these lessons, all children participate in physical activity throughout the day, including active brain breaks using active videos, active play at break and lunch with the support of teaching assistants and playground leaders, an active breakfast club and after school club and active lessons, focusing on the children moving around and increasing their levels of physical activity.

Children in Year 5 also participate in three half-terms of weekly swimming lessons (classes swap after three half-terms), which are facilitated by qualified swimming instructors at Queensway School, as well as Spiceball Leisure Centre. Our mission is to enable these pupils’ to have continuous weekly lessons in order to meet national curriculum expectations. In particular, the government wants pupils to be able to:

  •  Swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres.
  • Use a range of strokes effectively (e.g. front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke).
  • Perform safe self-rescue in different water based situations.

A high-quality PE curriculum will develop physical literacy and will allow pupils to learn about themselves, the importance of a healthy lifestyle, self-expression and concepts such as fair play and respect. It also contributes to the development of a range of important cognitive skills such as decision-making and analysis, and social skills such as teamwork and communication.

Our PE curriculum will be inclusive and ensure that pupils of all abilities access the range of activities we offer and that they are physically active for sustained periods of time in order to encourage them to lead healthy, active lives.

We are improving our programme of intra and inter-school competitions through our partnership with NOSSP (North Oxfordshire School Sport Partnership) who provide opportunities for pupils to participate in competitive sports and activities both in and beyond the curriculum. This will mean that pupils have the opportunity to participate at all of the four levels of competitive sport – competition in school, between schools, at county/area level and at national level.

Our mission is to improve and increase the quality and quantity of high quality PE for pupils, to show how PE can enhance pupils’ attainment and achievement and to create pathways for them to continue to be active beyond school. Our partnership with NOSSP and the continued support provided by a NOSSP PE mentor allows continued professional development amongst our teaching staff. The coach offers support and guidance in one indoor or outdoor slot, supporting and developing the confidence of our teaching staff in delivering an area of the PE curriculum and the use of the scheme ‘Get Set 4 PE’.

We will continue to develop our links to outside agencies and clubs, which will help to generate positive interaction in the community. We will continue to offer taster sessions, offering alternative clubs and physical activities, which are not normally taught throughout the PE curriculum and delivered by specialists.

We are striving towards improving the delivery of the teaching & learning of PE in order to promote participation, progress and performance. ‘High quality PE and school sport produces young people with the skills, understanding, desire and commitment to continue to improve and achieve in a range of PE, sport and health-enhancing physical activities in line with their abilities’ (DCMS Learning through PE & Sport).

Our school also recognises the impact that the provision of a high-quality PE and school sport curriculum has on the whole school and that it can lead to whole school improvements.

Developing pupil’s personal qualities through PE can affect their attitudes towards school and learning. When PE and school sport provision is of the highest quality, all pupils will, to the best of their abilities, develop and demonstrate the following personal qualities:

  • A strong desire to learn & make progress
  • High levels of dedication, attendance and involvement in PE and school sport
  •  High levels of commitment to PE and school sport
  • Good levels of positive behaviour such as politeness, fair play and helpfulness; and
  • High levels of enjoyment and enthusiasm and a strong desire to get involved.

At Queensway Primary School we welcomed the Government’s announcement in June 2013 to provide additional funding for 2 years to improve provision of physical education (PE) and sport in primary schools. We are committed to using this resource in developing high quality PE lessons, alongside greater opportunities for sporting competitions and clubs for all our young people.

The Sports Premium Funding report outlines how we have spent our sports funding and the impact it has had on the children of Queensway Primary School. A copy of this can be found on the school website.

Houses

Every pupil in the school becomes a member of one of our House teams and each term they have the opportunity to participate in an exciting inter-house competition.                              

Sulgrave (Red)

Broughton (Blue)

Wroxton (Green)

Upton (Yellow)

Keeping Active Links

Both Sport England and the Youth Sports Trust have both launched web-pages dedicated to ideas for getting active while at home and helping children to meet the chief medical officer’s recommendation of at least 60 minutes of daily activity.

https://www.sportengland.org/news/how-stay-active-while-youre-home

https://www.youthsporttrust.org/free-home-learning-resources

In addition, there are lots of other FREE resources

BBC super movers

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/supermovers

Joe Wicks Body Coach (Kids workout)

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=joe+wicks+kids+workout

Just Dance

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=just+dance+kids

Cosmic Kids Yoga

https://www.youtube.com/user/CosmicKidsYoga

Go Noodle

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=go+noodles+for+kids                                            

                                                                                     

The Arts

Art & DT

At Queensway, it is our aim for the children to be creative and imaginative in their Artwork.
We strive for the children to be skilled at using colour, texture, sculpture, shape, line and
tone. We aim to immerse the children in the work of various Artists and their styles so that
they can learn how to create art in a similar style.

How this looks in practice:

  • Teachers use the progression of skills document to plan their Art medium term plans.         
  • Art is taught on alternate terms to Design and Technology.
  • All year groups are using the progression of skills document carefully to ensure that the children’s skills are developing at an age appropriate rate in; colour, texture, sculpture, shape, line and tone.

What does Art and Design look like in Foundation Stage:
Expressive Arts and Design is one of the seven areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage and is used to develop a child's imagination, creativity and their ability to use media and materials. Children do this in range of ways including singing songs and making music, dancing, playing with colours, textures and design. At Queensway, we value the process of creating rather than the end product and our children are positively encouraged to develop and explore their own ideas as well as select their own materials and techniques in order to complete their designs.

At Queensway, children in both Nursery and Reception are able to develop their Art and Design skills through areas within their provision: design centre, junk modelling area, natural resources, malleable materials, painting easels, writing area, and large outside chalkboards. These are all activities and areas that are available to the children in their classrooms, both inside and outside. Additionally, children in Reception will receive EAD lessons throughout the term to focus on a certain skill, colour, pattern, or texture. This could be linked to their Literacy or Maths lessons or linked to their overarching topic. 

Children have regular opportunities to share their creations, models and designs with the class and they are encouraged to talk about what they like about their work. Additionally, the children are also encouraged to think about and suggest ways in which they are able to improve on their design ready for next time. 

By the end of Foundation Stage, we want our children to be able to:

Expressive Arts and Design ELG: Creating with Materials

  • Safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function; Share their creations, explaining the process they have used; - Make use of props and materials when role playing characters in narratives and stories.

Foundation Stage also have an Art gallery which is added to throughout the year which means that the Artwork grows and is a special place for everyone to aim to get their Artwork. Work that is displayed in these areas is chosen because the skills and techniques that the child has used is of a particularly good quality.

Using sketchbooks:

Each child in KS2 has a sketchbook in which their best quality artwork is kept. This is a book that moves with them throughout KS2 and really shows their journey through the skills and techniques that they develop. The children are encouraged to put a learning objective in their books before their work is started so that it is evident which skills are being applied.

Art Galleries:

We believe that it is important that all children should be able to feel as though their work is valued and one way in which we aim to achieve this at Queensway is through the use of Art Galleries. There are 4 Art galleries throughout the school; A Year 4, 5, 6 one in the Year 4 and 5 shared area, a Year 3 one in the corridor leading to the library, a Foundation Stage one in the corridor leading to the Foundation Stage unit and a KS1 one in the Year 1/2 shared area. Work that is displayed in these areas is chosen because the skills and techniques that the child has used is of a particularly good quality. All work is labelled with the child’s name and displayed in a variety of ways; pictures frames, stands, backed or photographed. Staff are also encouraged to put work in from children’s sketchbooks if this is appropriate. These galleries are added to throughout the year which means that the Artwork grows and is a special place for everyone to aim to get their Artwork. Staff are given time throughout the year to maintain and update the appearance of the Art Galleries so that they are always presentable and showcasing the best of the children’s work.

Role of the Art Leader:

  • Sketchbook scrutinies.
  • Be aware of CPD need amongst current staff and arrange training as appropriate.
  • Set up and keep a subject file including an action plan, progression of skills document, Art policy, and ensure that these are kept up to date. 
  • Attend NoxCEP (North Oxfordshire Cultural Education Programme) meetings which are held termly so that they are kept up to date on Artsmark and Arts Award programme)
  • Networking with the Art Leaders from other schools and liaise with them about CPD opportunities.
  • Attend partnership meetings and feedback information to relevant staff.
  • Reflect on your own subject knowledge and look at ways to improve through professional development opportunities. 
  • To create an environment where people feel confident to share their teaching ideas. 
  • Keep up to date on resources and replenish when necessary.
  • Keep an up-to-date contact list of local artists and sculptors that are available to lead workshops for the children and make sure that this is shared with all staff.
  • Check the appearance and amount of work displayed in the Art Galleries to make sure that they are of a high standard.

      

Music

Music in the EYFS

At Queensway, Music in the Early Years and Foundation stage is interwoven throughout daily practice and planning, both in adult-led input and child-led play.

Embedding Music within day-to-day routines allows moments that are tailored for a purpose: celebration, aiding structure, games and movement, supporting a change of pace, mood or activity and accompanying storytelling or role play. During these moments, children explore pitch and tone as a form of communication and support their speech and language development. Exposing children to music during early development helps them learn the sounds and meanings of words in addition to developing motor skills through movement in response to music. Music as a play-based activity may be implemented through instruments set out in an area for children to explore independently, often aided by adult interaction for guided progression. Allowing children to explore ensures that they can use both voice and instruments to creatively express thoughts and feelings and nurture their innate musicality.

Music in KS1-KS2

In Music, we aim to inspire the children to be excited about Music. As a staff we hope to pass on our enthusiasm and help the children to believe that they can achieve and that all people have musical ability. Children are taught in mixed ability groups, and activities may be differentiated to support the children’s needs. In addition to weekly Music lessons there are also many other opportunities for children to develop their musical abilities such as:

  • Learning a musical instrument through Music For Schools tuition
  • Developing their ability to play a musical instrument through lunchtime and after school clubs
  • Developing their singing through participating in the School Choir
  • Having the opportunity to perform in public such as school productions, events within the local community and school assemblies
  • Taking part in a weekly Singing Assembly.                             

When planning, all teachers use:

  • Units of work from Charanga Music Program identified on the school long term plan
  • Queensway Music progression of skills document
  • Queensway Medium term planning document - Composition only
  • Composition unit of work which fits in with other curriculum areas
  • A range of ways to inspire writing including carefully chosen pieces of music to be used in other Curriculum areas.
  • The marking and assessment policy.

Charanga Program

Every class uses the Charanga Program of study to deliver the skills and musical objectives to fulfil the criteria of the Music National Curriculum and which fits with Queensway’s Progression of skills for Music.

The Role of the Music Leader

The Music Leader needs to have a passion for Music and champion this area of the curriculum within the school. They need to ensure that they continue to develop their own understanding and expertise, keeping up with any new initiatives. They must have a good subject knowledge to enable them to lead the subject effectively and be able to provide support and training for other members of staff to ensure that the teaching and learning of this subject is consistent across the whole school. As part of this role they need to:

  • Audit and manage resources to ensure that teachers have what they need to deliver the Music curriculum effectively
  • Develop other teachers’ subject knowledge through support and training
  • Monitor the teaching and learning of Music across the school
  • Keep up to date with new initiatives
  • Raise awareness of Music opportunities within the local area to broaden children’s experiences.

Provide and encourage opportunities within the school to celebrate children’s musical achievements.

Arts Mark Award                                      

We are thrilled to say that we have been awarded the Silver Artsmark Award. The children and staff have been working hard in all areas of The Arts (Art, DT, Dance and Music) over the last two years and we have been recognised for that! The children took part in lots of cross-curricular learning, including drama workshops, music lessons and art lesson, all linked through a text. It is a fantastic achievement, and we are looking forward to sharing more of the work in the Arts with each other and you!

 

Contact Us

Queensway Primary School
Brantwood Rise, Banbury
Oxon, OX16 9NH

01295 251 631

Headteacher
Mrs Sarah Horbury-Jakeman